cPanel® Blog

WordPress Manager | A Better WordPress Experience with cPanel

Over the past year, we have been working to better develop both the infrastructure and the experience of using cPanel with WordPress. This time our goal has been to provide our customers with an easy, dependable, self-service method for managing WordPress sites through the cPanel interface. We are pleased to be releasing the first phase of this work to our customers in the form of WordPress Manager.

cPanel WordPress Manager is a plugin that comes shipped with our latest WordPress RPM via WHM cPAddons/cPanel Site Software. The new format for cPAddons automatically tests every new release of WordPress against supported versions of cPanel & WHM ensuring we can offer the most up to date version of WordPress to our users while maintaining compatibility.

Administrator User Password Resets

You requested and we’ve delivered!  Password resets are among the most common support requests for web hosting administrators with clients using WordPress. WordPress Manager alleviates the burden of manually resetting a client’s password credentials and introduces a simple, one-step process that allows any cPanel user to reset the password for any WordPress admin on their account.

Auto-Update Configuration Made Easy

Updates are a key component to maintaining security for WordPress sites as well as your servers. This is why all new installations of WordPress via WHM cPAddons/cPanel Site Software are automatically set to update all minor security updates by default. (Major version updates still have to be upgraded manually.)

While automatic updates are a convenience for most users, we have added options for site owners that need more control over how and when updates are applied. In the WordPress Manager settings, users can choose which automatic updates a client wants to have applied or to turn them off completely. We do this by changing WordPress global configuration variables without adding a plugin into WordPress.

Continued Commitment

Not only have we been hard at work delivering these features, we are also currently working on a roadmap for deeper cPanel & WordPress integration that will provide powerful tools that help your clients easily manage their own WordPress sites.  

For additional information about WordPress Manager, take a look at our new versioned documentation:


Want some insider information?

Join us for cPanel Conference in September, where we will be discussing this more in depth and presenting some of our new killer features!  

benny Vasquez

scripter, crafter, cPanel's Community Manager. Facilitating communication between cPanel's amazing development team, and cPanel's amazing community. Find me on twitter: @cpaneldev

  • Riger

    Am I missing something? WordPress already has a built in password reset feature (it’s been native in WordPress for years). All a user needs to do is click the “Lost your password?” link 😉

    Regardless of the above, please, please, please… Can cPanel always keep this as an optional plugin? That would be so much appreciated! – Thank you! 🙂

  • WordPress is easy to use and is great.

  • Ali Khan

    This vs Plesk’s WordPress Toolkit https://www.plesk.com/extensions/wordpress-toolkit/
    – Staging
    – Cloning
    – Migrate remote installations
    – Updates for WordPress + plugins and themes

  • Unlike other reviews, my hosting company does not like or even use Softaculous. We like to keep everything of cPanel in standard.
    This plugin will be great! But, I very much hope it is possible to manage installations that were not made by cPanel, most of my clients install or migrate their WordPress without using the cPanel installer.
    Make this plugin available in the official WordPress repository and allow it to work for any installation, it will be the best thing you guys have ever done!

    • benny Vasquez

      Thanks for the kind words! That’s definitely part of the plan. Depending on how things go, we’ll be adding the ability to manage installs that were installed with or without the help of cPAddons.

      • Fouad Fouad

        Thanks for this plugin, I was waiting for something like this from a long time, please expand WP support on Cpanel? I wish as an admin to control every WP installation on the server, specially updating WP and plugins, themes, because as you know, this is important for WP and for the whole server’s security, outdated WP installations and or plugins can lead to hacks and may be SPAM going out of the servers through these WP hacked sites!.
        In short, I wish to have WP full management plugin that makes our lives easier as administrators, like exactly the tool kit which the other Cpanel competitor provides!.

        • benny Vasquez

          That’s something we’d like to add, too!

          • Fouad Fouad

            Thanks, we are waiting!

  • Great plugin! I waiting for this. Thanks

  • electric

    I fail to see the point of this, when pretty much every hosting provider offers Softaculous or one of the other auto-installations softwares.

    The only thing I could find useful about this would be if cpanel could automatically detect if there’s a wordpress installation in the account, and then have a page to change common settings and do common functions. (ie: Change admin password, remove a plugin that’s causing failure, etc.)

    unfortunately, we won’t be enabling this cpanel WordPress Manager because it will cause confusion with our customers who are already familiar with Softaculous.

    But like I said.. it would be nice if cpanel could develop some WordPress tools that are actually useful like the functions above. (Change admin pw, remove plugin causing problems, etc.) Those are the very common support issues we see every day, and are what would be nice for cpanel to look into if they insist on allocating resources to this kind of thing.

    TL/DR: Why reinvent the wheel? I’d prefer cpanel actually offer useful tools instead of creating inferior ones that already exist.

    • benny Vasquez

      I can certainly understand that point of view, like I said below. We’ve got a slew of things that we’d like to do with this integration, but we’re starting here. If you have specific things you’d like to see, please do submit a feature request, or send me an email so I can get those requests to the right people. benny@cpanel.net

      • electric

        It would be helpful if you could let us know what is the “slew of things you would like to do with this integration”. Sometimes I feel cpanel works in the dark, releases these kinds of things, and then many of us sit back shaking our heads and wondering what is going on over at cpanel HQ and if we should send you some money so you can turn on the lights on.

        TL/DR: It would be helpful to share your roadmap with this stuff, so we can maybe provide input, so you can actually develop tools/features we will find useful.

        You keep mentioning that some people want this wordpress stuff (and presumably, whatever else you have planned), but I have yet to meet anyone… customer or hosting company owner.. who wants to see cpanel managed wordpress or other integration of stuff that’s already included in Sofaculous.

        (Unless you’re eventually planning to compete with Softaculous?)

  • mrl14

    Are your customers really using CPAddons? It doesn’t even compare to plugins like Softaculous. You should be building this into CPanel so that it can work and connect with Softaculous and other individual installations of wordpress. There is no way hosting companies are going to offer their clients Softaculous (for their large library of supported software and maintenance of scripts) and CPanel’s CPAddons WordPress Manager. What a confusing user experience this is going to bed. IMO, big mistake in the direction this is going. Please reconsider your implementation of a wordpress manager within CPanel. I am also unaware of a single CPanel hosting company who offers CPAddons instead of Softaculous.

    • benny Vasquez

      I completely understand your position, but I promise this decision wasn’t made in a vacuum. We are definitely building something our customers are asking for. If I can answer any specific questions, please do email me: benny@cpanel.net

    • Riger

      We don’t, Softaculous is NOT an option 😉

    • Rod Pascoe

      We don’t, hate Softaculous

      • MACscr

        Yep. softaculous is awful.

  • Jose Dieguez

    Do you really think this is necessary, when Softaculous, Deluxe, and many others softwares are used by like every hosting provider, on wich you can install and update wordpress, and 500+ software?… i just find this innecesary…. my opinion.

    • benny Vasquez

      We sure do! Discussions with our customers have told us that they want this, and so we’ve built it! Softaculous is a great piece of software, and offers a very different feature set.

      • Morten

        I totally agree with Jose. But if other customers want this, then I can understand it.

        • benny Vasquez

          Thanks, Moten! Just like a lot of our features, it won’t appeal to everyone. It’s definitely a huge thing for our users, and a huge support request reducer for our webhosts.

        • Rod Pascoe

          We’re one customer that want this, looking forward to improved WP support that’s native to cPanel.

          I’d rather have it in house than be installing extraneous software. Most of our installs are WP

    • Paul Srch

      In our case, this may be something worth looking into. We only host sites we’ve developed, and develop WordPress sites almost exclusively – out of 300 sites we only have three that use anything else, and of those three we’re redesigning them using WP. Currently, we use Installatron, which serves us well, but seems like overkill if we don’t use any other software. The advantage has always been that WordPress is automatically updated; if cPanel’s app is going to do that in any event, we might well switch to it and save ourselves the $50 / server we’re currently paying – and keep everything inside cPanel.

      As always, your mileage may vary – but there certainly is a usage scenario that exists,